This 29 Year Old Learned To Love Investing By Making It A Game

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Can saving your spare change with micro-investing apps like Acorns really pay off? According to 29 year old Bri Doty, micro-investing hasn’t just built her a bigger nest egg. It was exactly the hack she needed to work with and not against her own personality.

Out of sight, out of mind

“Out of sight, out of mind works best for me. I would love to grow my money without even thinking about it,” explained Bri, a graphic designer who works with us at Financial Finesse. “I know myself — and if I have money, I will want to spend it. But if I put this money in an account that I cannot see (not in my banking apps or where I’m able to spend via bank cards), I won’t even notice that my money is going to Acorns and is hopefully growing.” She observed that it’s the same principle as her 401(k), where saving and investing happens automatically without having to think about it every time.

This doesn’t just apply to saving. Bri says she does a similar thing for eating healthy by keeping junk food out of the house. If she doesn’t see it, she says, she won’t eat it.

Micro-Investing: a supercharged virtual change jar

I find the big idea behind Acorns, a fintech company which fuses America’s love of spending with a simple way to save, is elegance in its simplicity. In a nutshell, it’s a supercharged, digital version of saving your change in a jar on the counter. Users agree to let Acorns round up their credit and debit card expenditures to the next highest dollar and invest the difference in partial shares of broadly diversified exchange traded funds. The company also has a “Found Money” feature where partner merchants offer cash rewards from your purchases in the form of investments in your Acorns account. According to a profile of the company by reporter Dan Kadlec in Money last year, “asset accumulation occurs relentlessly in the background.”

If Bri saves $3 per day by rounding up purchases from things like coffee, lunch, groceries and cocktails for ten years and earned a 7 percent average annual return, her money would grow to $15,578. (See calculation here.) If she sweeps $5 per day into her account for ten years at 7 percent, she’d have $25,963. (See calculation here.) When she gets a nice bonus, a gift or a tax refund, she can also make extra deposits to her account to power it up.

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Can saving your spare change with micro-investing apps like Acorns really pay off? According to 29 year old Bri Doty, micro-investing hasn’t just built her a bigger nest egg. It was exactly the hack she needed to work with and not against her own personality.

Out of sight, out of mind

“Out of sight, out of mind works best for me. I would love to grow my money without even thinking about it,” explained Bri, a graphic designer who works with us at Financial Finesse. “I know myself — and if I have money, I will want to spend it. But if I put this money in an account that I cannot see (not in my banking apps or where I’m able to spend via bank cards), I won’t even notice that my money is going to Acorns and is hopefully growing.” She observed that it’s the same principle as her 401(k), where saving and investing happens automatically without having to think about it every time.

This doesn’t just apply to saving. Bri says she does a similar thing for eating healthy by keeping junk food out of the house. If she doesn’t see it, she says, she won’t eat it.

Micro-Investing: a supercharged virtual change jar

I find the big idea behind Acorns, a fintech company which fuses America’s love of spending with a simple way to save, is elegance in its simplicity. In a nutshell, it’s a supercharged, digital version of saving your change in a jar on the counter. Users agree to let Acorns round up their credit and debit card expenditures to the next highest dollar and invest the difference in partial shares of broadly diversified exchange traded funds. The company also has a “Found Money” feature where partner merchants offer cash rewards from your purchases in the form of investments in your Acorns account. According to a profile of the company by reporter Dan Kadlec in Money last year, “asset accumulation occurs relentlessly in the background.”

If Bri saves $3 per day by rounding up purchases from things like coffee, lunch, groceries and cocktails for ten years and earned a 7 percent average annual return, her money would grow to $15,578. (See calculation here.) If she sweeps $5 per day into her account for ten years at 7 percent, she’d have $25,963. (See calculation here.) When she gets a nice bonus, a gift or a tax refund, she can also make extra deposits to her account to power it up.

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